A2Z-Logo-C1Weddings, as anyone who has ever had one, been in one, planned one, or otherwise been significantly involved in one, can tell you, are stressful. In the planned sequel to Playing with Fire, my WIP Taking Chances, Cade and Stacy are about to get married. Stacy and her mother had never seen eye to eye on pretty much anything. Frankly, Stacy’s mother practically ignored her for most of her childhood. However, now that Stacy is getting married, her mother is determined to make the wedding into an Event. This causes no little conflict and friction between the two, to say the least. Cade, unfortunately, more often than not, ends up playing referee as he is in the snippet I am sharing today.


 

“One of us is not going to survive this wedding.”

Most men hearing such a declaration only days before their marriage would have been alarmed, but since Cade Dawson had been hearing variations of this statement periodically for the past six months, he simply rolled his eyes. “Hello to you too.”

“I’m not joking, Cade,” his fiancée Stacy replied. “One of us is going to die. Either I’m going to completely lose it and kill her, or she is going to drive me completely insane, and I will kill myself just to get away from her. I told you we should have eloped to Vegas.”

“My mother would have never forgiven us,” he reminded her, propping a hip on the edge of his desk and cradling his phone between his neck and shoulder. Across the small office, his fellow deputy, Malcolm, raised an eyebrow in inquiry. He mouthed ‘‘Stacy’. Malcolm shook his head ruefully and turned back to his work.

“I know… I know…” Stacy sounded thoroughly exasperated. “You better be glad I love Mama Mary. She’s the only reason I didn’t insist we go to Vegas month ago. I know seeing you married is important to her, but I swear, Cade, I’m going to throttle my mother if she criticizes my choices one more time.”

“Don’t answer any more calls from her today,” Cade said gently. “Do not engage with her.”

“It won’t work,” Stacy protested. “If I ignore her, she’’ll just blow up my phone.”

“She might,” he agreed. “Turn off the phone if you need to while you’re in the office. Just let me know when you are on your way home, okay?”

Stacy huffed out a breath. “Fine. I swear if I make it to this weekend without committing murder, it’s going to be a miracle.”

“You’ll make it,” he told her. “We’re getting married on Saturday, and it’s going to be wonderful. I’m not about to let Lenora or anyone else get in the way of that.” He walked to the back of the office where there one small interrogation room, little bigger than a closet, stood and lowered his voice for Stacy’s ears only. “If you behave and hold your tongue, I’ll make it up to you later tonight. I know it’s hard, but I know you can do it.”

“Promise?” Stacy asked. He could hear her smiling.

“Absolutely,” he replied. “Good girls get rewarded.”

“Cade!” she hissed. He swallowed a laugh, knowing she had just gone vividly red. Stacy was worldly to the point of being nearly unshakeable. Nothing embarrassed her – except when he called her a good girl. Though she secretly loved it when he did and had admitted as much in private, it also automatically made her vividly physically uncomfortable to the point of causing an almost instantaneous and unconscious blush from her neck to the roots of her hair.

“It won’t work,” Stacy protested. “If I ignore her, she’’ll just blow up my phone.”

“She might,” he agreed. “Turn off the phone if you need to while you’re in the office. Just let me know when you are on your way home, okay?”

Stacy huffed out a breath. “Fine. I swear if I make it to this weekend without committing murder, it’s going to be a miracle.”

“You’ll make it,” he told her. “We’’re getting married on Saturday, and it’s going to be wonderful. I’m not about to let Lenora or anyone else get in the way of that.” He walked to the back of the office where there one small interrogation room, little bigger than a closet, stood and lowered his voice for Stacy’s ears only. “If you behave and hold your tongue, I’ll make it up to you later tonight. I know it’s hard, but I know you can do it.”

“Promise?” Stacy asked. He could hear her smiling.

“Absolutely,” he replied. “Good girls get rewarded.”

“Cade!” she hissed. He swallowed a laugh, knowing she had just gone vividly red. Stacy was worldly to the point of being nearly unshakeable. Nothing embarrassed her – except when he called her a good girl. Though she secretly loved it when he did and had admitted as much in private, it also automatically made her vividly physically uncomfortable to the point of causing an almost instantaneous and unconscious blush from her neck to the roots of her hair.

“What?” he asked innocently.

“You know what. I’m working, dammit,” she spat.

“You make it sound like we’re having phone sex,” Cade teased. “All I said was –“

“Don’t you dare,” Stacy broke in. “So help me, Matthew Kincaid Dawson, if you say that again, I will make you regret it. I might even decide we should be celibate until after the wedding.”

“You wouldn’t,” Cade said. “That would be as hard on you as it was on me.”

“Don’t try me,” Stacy warned.

“Okay, I’ll stop,” Cade agreed. He’d had no intention of teasing her further anyway. She was sufficiently distracted now and that had been the goal.


It may be an unconventional way to referee, but you’ve got to admit, Cade gets points for style. 😉  Drop in on the rest of the blog hop and see what everyone else is up to. We’re almost to the finish line. 🙂